DIPLOMA IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

This programme is an Exit Level Outcomes based qualification registered at the Council for Higher Education (CHE) as a National Diploma in Criminal Justice.

Better Best Educational Projects has been provisionally registered by the Department of Higher Education and Training until 31 December 2017 (Deadline extended until August 2018). DHET (2014/HE07/006) to offer the SAQA registered qualification 79466 Diploma: Criminal Justice. NQF Level 6 Credits 374

DHET Reference Number: 2014/HE07/006

Course Prospects

In all countries of the world security is all important.  South Africa is no exception.  This Diploma in Criminal Justice is devised to enable candidates to become part of the solution to the crime problem in our country, not only in the field of security, but also in the law enforcement structures.

It will also empower successful candidates be active role players in the community in the application of community policing, problem-solving and rehabilitation of problem individuals.

Entrance Requirements

Grade 12 / Senior Certificate or any equivalent qualification as prescribed (FETC (V) level 4.

Programme Duration

Minimum:  3 years
Maximum:  6 years

First year Second year Third year
General Management Criminal Law I Crime Prevention
Business Communication Law of Procedure and Evidence Project Management for Law Enforcement
Business Law Security Practice II Security Practice III
Concepts of Policing I Concepts of Policing II Crowd Management
Security Practice I Management the Patrol Function Business Ethics
Crime Scene Management Criminal Law II

SUPPLEMENTARY EXAM (applicable to November candidates ONLY)

Articulation

Learners with this qualification will be able to enroll for a degree at Universities offering Policing related qualifications (eg Unisa (BA Police Science) North West, Tshwane University of Technology TUT) and Southern Business School (SBS) for the B Police Practice and the University of the North (Criminal Justice).

RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING (RPL)

Application:  7 January 2015 – 30 March 2015

Feedback on RPL applications:  17 June 2015

Credits for the Completion of the Providers Qualification (Betterbest Certificate in Criminal Justice) Learners who has completed the providers Qualification can apply to the Academic Board for the transfer of credits towards the Accredited Diploma in Criminal Justice. Learners may apply for credits for the following subjects (if the scored more than 65% in the CJS subject

The following subjects are applicable:

Old subjects Credits awarded for subject
Leadership Management General Management
Business Ethics Business Law
Policing / Metro Policing Concept of Policing I
Community Safety. Security Practice I
Reactive CJ / Traffic Man Crime Scene Management
Criminal & Crime related CJ / Juris Prudence Criminal Law I
Military Police Law of Procedure and Evidence
Private security Security Practice II
Policing 2 / Metro Policing Concepts of Policing II
Proactive CJ / Traffic Law 1/ Metro / Traffic Man Management the Patrol Function
Criminology/ Proactive CJ Crime Prevention

 Relevance of the Diploma in Criminal Justice in the Safety in Society fraternity.

Criminal justice, with reference to law enforcement officials is a demanding career requiring exceptional skills and knowledge. This qualification is directed at the public and private security industry as well as the broader field of policing, justice and corrections. Security and risk management, although there are many generic issues, distinguishes itself from related fields of study such as social control, the criminal justice system and community safety, to warrant independent study.

Security and risk control practices is fast becoming a specialised field of study in safety and security in South Africa. Law enforcement investigators, analysts and response officers should be able to manage the primary and secondary functions within the sphere of policing in the public and private policing environment. Learners will be required to integrate this required core knowledge in society and effectively execute their functions. There is definitive escalating demand for professionally trained, practically orientated and knowledgeable law enforcement officers.

Private policing (security) is by far the largest sector in terms of numbers in the broader field of “policing” in South Africa. Indications are that the private law enforcement industry and governmental policing agencies will in future work more closely together in an effort to stem the unacceptable level of crime. It is therefore imperative that the private and public spheres of policing align their qualifications, as many of the issues that impact on the public law enforcement agencies also have a direct influence on the private law enforcement industry.

This qualification is career directed. Private and public sector law enforcers are offered the opportunity to enter the field of policing or to establish a private enterprise in the field of security. Apart from following a career as a private or public law enforcement officer, successful learners will also be able to articulate to related fields of study such as criminology and more specifically that of a police, traffic, metropolitan police or security officer. Learners studying towards this qualification will find that the acquisition of the numerous competencies in the qualification will add value to their understanding of any of these sectors and functioning in the work place. It will provide for consolidation of the broad knowledge, skills and values needed in criminal justice. This Diploma: Criminal Justice is designed to provide opportunities for the qualifying learner to access positions in:

  • Safety and security.
  • Various sectors within the broader context of policing.

It is also of benefit to practitioners within the public and private security and law enforcement industry and the Criminal Justice environment as a whole
Learning strategy

Content Based

Content of the course material will be theoretically based and teaching will be facilitated by means of contact sessions, group discussions and role-play sessions.

Practical Application

As this qualification is offered at Higher Educational (tertiary) Level, which is Exit Level Outcomes based, no practical component will officially form part of the facilitation. Where needed role-ply exercises like for example mock courtroom sittings could be done during official classroom sessions.

First Year
1st semester

General Management

General Management consists of 10 study units. When you are employed in the Criminal Justice System and you are placed in a position where you need to take and make decisions, you are busy implementing and applying some of the management principles. It is therefore not only people in managerial positions that need to acquaint themselves with the basic management principles, but every employee in an organisation or department. This is especially true for law enforcement officers who are on a daily basis in contact with crime and criminal related issues and problems which need to be solved in the most amicable way.

In this Module on General Management, we give Learners a basic introduction to the various management concepts, principles and subjects that a law enforcement officer needs to know and understand in order to be a successful person in the daily execution of duties. Management concepts that will be discussed are organisational behaviour (Unit 1); Leadership (Unit 2); Planning (Unit 3);Organising (Unit 4); Control (Unit 5); Creative problem solving (Unit 6); Change management (Unit 7); Communication (Unit 8); Strategic thinking (Unit 9); and Conflict Management (Unit 10).

Table of contents

STUDY UNIT 1:    ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR 
STUDY UNIT 2:    LEADERSHIP
STUDY UNIT 3:    PLANNING
STUDY UNIT 4:    ORGANISING
STUDY UNIT 5:    CONTROL
STUDY UNIT 6:    CREATIVE PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING
STUDY UNIT 7:    CHANGE MANAGEMENT
STUDY UNIT 8:    COMMUNICATION
STUDY UNIT 9:    STRATEGIC THINKING
STUDY UNIT 10:    CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

Business Communication

Communication remains the most important aspect in any institution. In the Module Business Communication we will give learners an exposition of the general principles applicable to business communication. We will discuss topics such as the ccontextualization of business communication (Unit 1); we define certain definitions related to business communication (Unit 2) We also elaborate on business communication concepts (Unit 3), channels for business communication (Unit 4) and methods of business communication (Unit 5). We also introduce a model of effective communication (Unit 6) and indicate the different business communication barriers (Unit 7). We conclude with the protection of business information within institutions (Unit 8).  Qualified learners should on completion of this module be able to apply their communication skills within any business environment

Table of contents

UNIT 1        CONTEXTUALISATION OF BUSINESS COMMUNICATION.
UNIT 2        BUSINESS COMMUNICATION DEFINED
UNIT 3        BUSINESS COMMUNICATION CONCEPTS
UNIT 4        CHANNELS FOR BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
UNIT 5        METHODS OF BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
UNIT 6        A MODEL OF EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
UNIT 7        BUSINESS COMMUNICATION BARRIERS
UNIT 8        PROTECTION OF BUSINESS INFORMATION

Business Law

The running of a business entails a lot of things – and must also be done within the perimeters of the law. In this Module on Business Law, we give learners a basic introduction to Business Law, the principles and elements of business security, as well as various fields of security measures within a business organisation. A discussion on the value of security laws in support of law-enforcement by the security officer, the constitutional principles of security and the responsibility of the security officer to abide by these constitutional rules will also form part of this Module. Qualified learners should on completion of this module be able to apply their Business Law skills within any business environment

Table of contents

STUDY UNIT ONE: SOUTH AFRICAN LEGAL SYSTEM AND LEGAL CONCEPTS
STUDY UNIT TWO: PRINCIPLES OF THE SOUTHAFRICAN LAW OF CONTRACT
STUDY UNIT THREE: SALE, LEASE AND INSURANCE CONTRACTS
STUDY UNIT FOUR: EMPLOYMENT, WORK, MANDATE AND AGENCY
STUDY UNIT FIVE: THE SOUTH AFRICAN LAW OF DELICT
STUDY UNIT SIX: SOUTH AFRICAN LAW RELATING TO TYPICAL FORMS OF BUSINESSES
STUDY UNIT SEVEN: PROPERTY, PAYMENT AND SECURITY
STUDY UNIT EIGHT: ELEMENTS OF CONSUMERISM

Computer Skills

Table of contents

UNIT 1:    INTRODUCTION AND BASIC PRINCIPLES OF A COMPUTER
UNIT 2:    MICROSOFT WORD
UNIT 3:    WORKING IN A WORD DOCUMENT
UNIT 4:    FORMATTING TEXT
UNIT 5:    BORDERS, BULLETS AND BREAKS

2nd  Semester  

Concepts of Policing 1

In this Module a distinction between police and policing will be drawn. The emphasis will, however, be placed on the South African Police Service (SAPS) as a national police service. As any organisation, the SAPS do have a mission and vision statement which forms the backbone of their objectives and roles. The values and functions of the South African Police Service (SAPS) will be discussed in order to enable you as student to fully understand what policing in this country is all about. The proactive and reactive roles of the SAPS are emphasised as these roles form the essence of policing in South Africa.

After 1994 the police force had to change to a police service in order to serve the community better as part of a dispensation called democratic policing. In order to adapt to democratic policing, the SAPS had to adopt different styles of policing. As part of this effort to deliver better service to the community, new philosophies such as community policing, partnership policing, problem-orientated policing and sector policing became part of a new policing philosophy and policing style. The aim of this module is to develop an understanding, competencies, and an attitude supportive of the Constitution and the Bill of Human Rights, towards the process of policing.

On completion of this module, Learners will be able to understand the unique nature of policing and the nature of influences that must be taken into account when making decisions within the context and towards the attainment of effective and efficient policing.

Table of contents

Unit 1:        The Concepts Police and Policing
Unit 2:        The Role of Police in Society
Unit 3:        The South African Police Service as a National Police Service
Unit 4:        Policing in a Democracy
Unit 5:        Policing Styles
Unit 6:        Community Policing
Unit 7:        Problem-Oriented Policing (POP)
Unit 8:        Partnership Policing
Unit 9:        Sector Policing

Security Practice 1

Safety and security is a very important aspect in any society. The SAPS (as primary protector of society) is no longer in a position to fulfill its’ mandate alone – the need the support of private security institutions. In the Module on Security Practice 1, we give learners a basic introduction to Private Security practices. We elaborate also on the principles and elements of security and various fields of security within an organisation. We also augmented on a discussion of the value of security laws in support of law-enforcement by the security officer. The principles of security, reactive security (investigation of crime) and the responsibility of the investigating security officer are highlighted. Qualified learners should on completion of this module be able to apply their skills in security in either the public or private sectors

Table of contents

Unit 1     Principles and Elements of Security
Unit 2     Training of private security officers.
Unit 3     Personnel Security
Unit 4     IMPLEMENTATION OF COMMUNICATION SECURITY
Unit 5     Technological Security
Unit 6     SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
Unit 7   CODE OF CONDUCT FOR PRIVATE SECURITY OFFICERS

FIRST YEAR 2nd SEMESTER

Crime scene management

As Students in the field of Criminal justice, Learners are most certainly aware of the high crime rates that are prevalent in South Africa. Some of these statistics on serious violent crimes such as rape and murder are frightening.  Although various actions can be taken to prevent and lessen the crime rate, it must be ensured that many crimes that are committed on a daily basis are properly investigated for the necessary legal actions to be able to effectively take their course.

The role of the crime investigator is therefor of utmost importance. The crime investigator has to ensure that the crime scene is properly investigated, that the witnesses and suspects are properly questioned and that physical evidence found at the crime scene is effectively collected, packed, marked and forwarded to the forensic experts for the necessary analysis. If the processing of the crime scene is done in accordance with these basic principles, the scales of justice will, in the end, swung in favour of the perpetrators being convicted. For the investigator to be able to do just that, proper management of the crime scene as well as the total investigative process is necessary.

In this Module we tried to introduce you as crime investigator to the basic investigative management principles and how to utilise these principles in the successful investigation of crime. This study guide is aimed at the crime investigator who is in daily contact with crime and crime scenes at grassroots level. This study guide will therefore enable you as crime investigator to make a direct and continuous contribution to the daily management of crime investigations.

Table of contents

Study Unit 1:    Basic Principles of Crime Investigation
Study Unit 2:    Identify the nature of the scene in relation to the crime committed
Study Unit 3:    Processing of the crime scene
Study Unit 4:    Recording the crime scene
Study Unit 5:    Writing statements and reports

2nd year
1st semester

Criminal Law 1

In a society the Rule of Law forms the back-bone of a democratic state where citizens are guaranteed that their constitutional rights will be protected. This can only be realised if laws exist to ensure order and it is implemented and applied properly by law enforcement officials. In the Module on Criminal Law 1, we give learners an exposition of the general principles of Criminal Law 1 (Unit 1). The nature of legal rules and the sources of SA Law are explained in detail.  We discuss the role of decided cases (Case law) in criminal law (Unit 2) the principle of legality (unit 3) the elements of a crime (Act) (Unit 4) unlawfulness (Unit 5) criminal responsibility (Unit 6) as well as the principles for punishment by the courts (Unit 7). We elaborate on the grey areas (Unit 8) in criminal Law. More detailed discussions on specific crimes will be dealt with in detail in Criminal Law 2 during the 2nd semester

Table of contents

UNIT 1:    INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW
UNIT 2:    SOUTH AFRICAN CRIMINAL LAW    
UNIT 3:    THE PRINCIPLE OF LEGALITY IN CRIMINAL LAW
UNIT 4:    ELEMENTS OF CRIME: THE ACT
UNIT 5:    ELEMENTS OF CRIME: UNLAWFULNESS
UNIT 6:    ELEMENTS OF CRIME: CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY
UNIT 7:    THE ELEMENTS OF CRIME: PENALTY CLAUSE
UNIT 8:    PERSONS INVOLVED IN CRIMES

Law of Criminal Procedure and Evidence.

Law of Criminal procedure and Evidence forms the backbone of the qualification and should be linked and integrated in almost all the other Modules. The subject describes the process and application of the rule in law in a democratic society. It indicates the power and authority of law enforcement officials in the maintaining and restoration of order. It also address to limitations placed on activities of such officials. Power and authority are dangerous – but important- tools in the hands of law enforcement officials. Therefor they must be applied with great cautious in a democratic society.

In this Module we gave learners an exposition of the general principles of the law of criminal procedure (Unit 1). The Criminal Justice Process is explained in detail.  We discussed the pre-trial phase (Unit 2) the arraignment phase (Unit 3) the trial phase (Unit 4) and the sentencing phase (Unit 5) as prescribed in the Criminal Procedure Act. We discuss the relevant aspects of the Law of Evidence in Part B.  Qualified learners should on completion of this module be able to apply their skills in the administration and adjudication of criminal justice in a more competent manner.

Table of contents

Part     A             Law of Criminal Procedure
UNIT 1: GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF THE LAW OF CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
UNIT 2: THE PRE-TRIAL PHASE
UNIT 3: THE ARRAINMENT PHASE
UNIT 4: THE TRIAL PHASE
UNIT 5: THE SENTENCING PHASE

PART B LAW OF EVIDENCE
CHAPTER 1: THE ROLE OF THE LAW OF EVIDENCE WITHIN THE         
LEGAL SYSTEM 
CHAPTER 2        CAUTIONARY RULES
CHAPTER 3:     HEARSAY EVIDENCE
CHAPTER 4        EVIDENCE ON CHARACTER
5    OPINION EVIDENCE
6    SIMILAR FACTS
7    PREVIOUS CONSISTENT STATEMENTS
8    REFRESHING OF MEMORY
9     ADMISSIONS AND CONFESSIONS
10    COMPETENCE AND COMPELLABILITY
11    REAL EVIDENCE

Security Practice 2  

The property and lives of the citizens of our country can be safeguarded by various security measures implemented by the South African Police Service as well as other law enforcement agencies. Private security companies serves as an example as an institution that employ or contract security officials to guard over and protect the property, lives and belongings of those who contracted them.

One way of protecting the property of clients is by means of environmental design. By designing the structure of a new building wisely or by designing the route of a new highway through a city or residential area cleverly, the city engineer or traffic engineer might reduce the opportunity to easily get access to that building or to commit a traffic violation on that redesigned road or highway.  It can also place serves as an obstacle to an escape route after the commission of a crime in an adjacent residential or industrial area.

What goes hand-in-hand with effective environmental design is the utilisation of the latest electronic and mechanical security and detection technology, now available in the marketplace as part of a three-line of defence principle. To assist and enhance the effective implementation of these security measures, adequate security legislation needs to be in place. When enforcing laws the possibility exists that human rights might be violated – especially in security related law enforcements. To guarantee the privacy and fair enforcement of these laws, security officers need to abide by and adhere to the requirements of our Constitution in the performance of their duties.

Table of contents

Unit 1:    Security through environmental design
Unit 2:    Three lines of defence in security by means of mechanical crime prevention
Unit 3:    Integrated security technology
Unit 4:    Security Laws
Unit 5:    Principles of Constitutional Security

2ND YEAR 2nd SEMESTER
Concepts of Policing 2

In this Module (Policing 2: Policing related concepts) we will give Learners an exposition of theconcepts related to the field of study of policing (unit1). Taken into account the complexity of policing in a democratic society linked with the need for an integrated approached to ensure effective and efficient policing, we will discuss aspects such as policing as a science and the relationship between policing and other science (unit 2). Ffundamental policing (unit 3) functional policing (unit 4) the importance of policing in a democratic society is dependent upon public approval and support. Therefor problematic issues associated the successful implementation of policing (unit 5) are discussed in detail. Qualified learners should on completion of this module be able to apply their skills in the administration of policing aspects within the criminal justice system. The will have a better understanding of the concept – partnership policing.

Table of contents

STUDY UNIT 1:    CONCEPTS RELATED TO THE FIELD OF STUDY OF POLICING
STUDY UNIT 2:    POLICING AS A SCIENCE    
STUDY UNIT 3:    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN POLICING AND OTHER SCIENCE
STUDY UNIT 4:    FUNDAMENTAL POLICING            
THEME 1:            THE ROLE OF POLICE IN SOCIETY
THEME 2:            POLICING AND THE CONSTITUTION : CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS RELEVANT TO POLICING
THEME 3:            CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS OF PRISONERS WHO ARE ARRESTED, DETAINED AND ACCUSED
STUDY UNIT 5:    FUNCTIONAL POLICING            
THEME 1 :           THE SCOPE OF FUNCTIONAL POLICING
THEME 2 :           CRIME PREVENTION APPROACHES AND MODELS
THEME 3:            STYLES OF POLICING
STUDY UNIT 6:    PROBLEMATIC ISSUES ASSOCIATED  WITH POLICING

THEME 1:            POLICE COMMUNITY RELATIONS
THEME 2:            POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY
THEME 3:            MANAGEMENT OFDIVERSITY IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
THEME 4:            UNIONISM IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Managing the patrol function

Combating crime is a process of reactive as well as proactive action from the different law enforcement agencies in our country. Proactive criminal justice deals with the ways in which crime can be prevented. It should always be remembered that certain factors need to be present before a crime can be committed successfully. The opportunity to commit a crime as well as the desire to commit a crime must be present before a crime can be committed.

One of the most effective techniques in crime prevention, in other words, to remove the opportunity to commit a crime, is by means of patrol duties. Patrol duty is one of the most general and daily practiced activities of any policing agency all over the world. In order to patrol an area effectively, the patrol function needs to be planned, controlled and coordinated properly in order to enable the patrol officer to take problem-solving split-second decisions.

Patrol duties can be classified as a short term crime prevention technique. In order to execute this crucial policing function effectively, various patrol methods and techniques could be utilised by law enforcement officers. These techniques include foot patrol, bicycle patrol, vehicle patrol, helicopter patrol and patrol on horseback. As the patrol officer is in constant contact with the public, this form of crime prevention also carries some dangers for the patrol officer which need to be planned carefully in order to safeguard patrol officers form assaults or murders by criminal perpetrators.

Table of contents

Unit 1:        Short-Term Crime Prevention 
Unit 2:        The Process of Planning as management tool
Unit 3:        Decision-making and problem-solving
Unit 4:        The patrol function
Unit 5:        Coordinating patrol activities
Unit 6:        Supervising the patrol function

Criminal Law 2

In the Module Criminal Law 1 we discussed the different elements of a crime that needs to be proven during a court case in order for the presiding officer to come to a fair and just decision about the innocence or guilt of the perpetrator. These elements of a crime need to be proven beyond reasonable doubt in order to guarantee a fair trial in accordance with our country’s Constitution.

In this Module of Criminal Law 2, the emphasis will be on all those elements of crimes that need to be proven, but in this instance specific crimes will be discussed in order to enable you as law enforcement officer to investigate your crimes, interview your witnesses and suspects and collect physical evidence with those elements of the crime in mind.

Crimes which will be discussed are the Crimes against the Administration of Justice like perjury and defeating the ends of justice; crime against life like murder and culpable homicide; crimes against bodily integrity and dignity like assault and crimen injuria; sexual offences and crimes against mortality like rape and sexual assault; and crimes against property like housebreaking, robbery, etc. and lastly some statutory offences.

Table of contents

Unit 1:        Crimes against the administration of justice
Unit 2:        Crimes against life
Unit 3:        Crimes against bodily integrity and dignity
Unit 4:        Sexual offences and crimes against mortality
Unit 5:        Crimes against property
Unit 6:        Crimes against the safety of the state
Unit 7:        Some Statutory Provisions

3rd year
1st  semester

Crime Prevention

Combating crime is a process of reactive as well as proactive action by the police and members of the different communities. Some of the Modules like Crime Scene Management or the Law Modules mainly deal with what happens after a crime has been committed. We call this action reactive policing. Proactive policing or crime prevention deals mainly with the ways in which crime can be prevented.

The Module of Crime Prevention explains the meaning of proactive policing or crime prevention. It is important that learners get acquainted with a few key concepts such as crime combating, crime control, crime prevention, and crime deterrence. Without this basic knowledge you will battle to understand issues like the consequences of crime, the purpose of crime prevention, crime prevention approaches and the different crime prevention models or strategies that law enforcement agencies can apply in order to get the crime situation under control.

Table of contents

Unit 1:    Elements of crime prevention
Unit 2:    Roles in crime prevention
Unit 3:    The Process of Planning in crime prevention
Unit 4:    Co-coordinating and Communicating Crime Prevention Strategies
Unit 5:    Short-Term Crime Prevention: Patrolling 
Unit 6:    Medium-Term Crime Prevention: Environmental Design
Unit 7:    Long-Term Crime Prevention: Education and Problem-Solving

Project Management

Project management forms a very important aspect of effective and efficient management of every task that needs to be completed – that also includes tasks performed by law enforcement officials.  In this Module we teach learners about the basic knowledge and understanding of the principles and elements of Project Management. We discuss issues such as the training of Project Management officers, implementation of Project Management phases and administration of basic Project Management Methodologies. On completion of this course, qualified learners will be able to apply their skills in a Project Management related environment – in either the public or private sectors

Table of contents

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT
UNIT 2: OBJECTIVES OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT
UNIT 3: ESTABLISHING PROJECT METHODOLOGIES
UNIT 4: INITIATE THE PROJECT
UNIT 5: PLANNING THE PROJECT
UNIT 6: EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF THE PROJECT
UNIT 7: PROJECT REVIEW AND CLOSURE

(Security Practice  3 )

Table of contents

STUDY UNIT 1:    FUNDAMENTAL ANCHORING
STUDY UNIT 2:    BUSINESS ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP
STUDY UNIT 3:    ETHICAL POSITIONING AND DESIGN
STUDY UNIT 4:    ETHICS AND PROCESSES     
STUDY UNIT 5:    BUSINESS-ETHICAL TRANSGRESSIONS, CAUSES AND DYNAMICS 
STUDY UNIT 6:    THE CONSEQUENCES OF UNETHICAL LEADERSHIP AND BUSINES PRACTICES 
STUDY UNIT 7:    COUNTERING UNETHICAL CONDUCT – UPHOLDING BUSINESS ETHICS

2nd  semester

Crowd Management

As part of our Basic Human Rights, employees in particular and citizens of our country in general are allowed to strike and demonstrate their unhappiness with their circumstances. These demonstrations are usually displayed in a crowd formation. This human right is, however, not an absolute right and must not violate the rights of other people. In order to guarantee that the rights of everybody in this country are safeguarded, certain Laws and Regulations are promulgated in order to control and manage crowds effectively.

In this Module on Crowd Control, we will give Learners a basic introduction to Crowd Control and its different terminologies, types of crowds, their right to form a crowd, legislation governing crowds and the formation thereof, how the crowds and the law enforcement officer should react and respond and their responsibilities, what the Constitution says about crowds and crowd control, etc.
Crowds do not only get together during protest actions or labour related strikes and demonstrations. People gather in great numbers during big sport events like the 2010 soccer matches that were held in our country. In order to make sure those citizens who form part of those crowds can enjoy their sport activities in a safe environment, crowd at these gatherings also need to be controlled and managed. The management of big events will therefore form an integral part of this Module.

Table of contents

STUDY UNIT ONE:     ORIENTATION
STUDY UNIT TWO:    CROWD BEHAVIOUR
STUDY UNIT THREE:  TYPES OF CROWD
STUDY UNIT FOUR:   RIOTS
STUDY UNIT FIVE:    DEMONSTARTIONS
STUDY UNIT SIX:      PRINCIPLES OF CROWD CONTROL
STUDY UNIT SEVEN: BIG EVENTS MANAGEMENT

Business ethics

South Africa is experiencing a moral crisis as a result of the absence of moral ethics. Former pres. Nelson Mandela stated that the moral fabric of society is rotten. The case worsens during the last decade – merely as a result of the absence of business ethics.

In the module of business ethics, we define ethics and business ethics. We elaborate on the mandating of the business-ethical boundaries. We link business ethics and leadership and discuss the importance of a value system (core values, business philosophies and leadership philosophy) within a business environment. We discuss ethics and processes, business-ethical transgressions and indicated the causes and dynamics of unethical conduct. The consequences of unethical leadership and business practices are highlighted. We try to offer countering unethical conduct in order to upholding business ethics. On completion of this module learners will have a better understanding of the importance of business ethics and the damage it can cause to a society.

Table of contents

STUDY UNIT 1:    FUNDAMENTAL ANCHORING  
STUDY UNIT 2:    BUSINESS ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP
STUDY UNIT 3:    ETHICAL POSITIONING AND DESIGN
STUDY UNIT 4:    ETHICS AND PROCESSES
STUDY UNIT 5:    BUSINESS-ETHICAL TRANSGRESSIONS, CAUSES AND DYNAMICS 
STUDY UNIT 6:    THE CONSEQUENCES OF UNETHICAL LEADERSHIP AND BUSINES PRACTICES 
STUDY UNIT 7:    COUNTERING UNETHICAL CONDUCT – UPHOLDING BUSINESS ETHICS

Security Practice 3

In order to implement Security effectively and efficient, a more broaden knowledge of security is required. In addition to the information supplied to Learners in security 1 and 2, we will elaborate in more detail on some of the aspects. In the Module Security practice 3 we will expose the learners to concepts such asAsset, risk including probability and impact and risk analysis.  We will discuss the risk analysis mandate, the identification of assets and the accompanying risks endangering such assets. The aspect of measuring risk and the determination of the impact on the organization will be explained. This includes the risk-analysis matrix, the prioritizing of risk and the compilation of a risk management report.

We will (apart from normal security control measures like access control, decision making, etc.) also indicate how conflict, as a risk, can be identified and managed. On completion of this Module learners should be equipped to perform more advance security functions.

Table of contents

STUDY UNIT ONE:   CONCEPT VULNERABILITY
STUDY UNIT TWO:   DEVELOPING A SECURITY PLAN
STUDY UNIT THREE: PRINCIPLES OF SECURITY MANAGEMENT
STUDY UNIT FOUR:  RECRUITMENT AND VETTING OF SECURITY PERSONNEL
STUDY UNIT FIVE:  TRAINING FOR SECURITY
STUDY UNIT SIX:   ACCESS CONTROL MEASURES
STUDY UNIT SEVEN: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL

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